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Hakim Solovyov
Hakim Solovyov

Rhyme Dictionary Online [PATCHED]


In a nutshell, a rhyme is the repetition of similar or exact-sounding words, usually in the final stressed syllables of a sentence and following sentences containing two or more words. Rhymes typically get found in the final positions of each line in poetry or song lyrics.




Rhyme Dictionary Online


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Many people will agree that rhymes are a delightful form of expression in the written and spoken word. You may not know it, but there are several different categories of rhymes in use, many of which you will already be familiar with.


A perfect rhyme is where words sound similar in their final stressed syllable. For example, single or masculine perfect rhymes place stress on the final syllables, whereas double or feminine perfect rhymes place stress on the second from last syllables.


In short, Mind rhyming is substituting an alternate word for word that would make sense in the position. If a person who hears it, automatically substitutes the real word for the substitution, a mind rhyme has occurred.


Lastly, position rhymes, as the term suggests, get classified according to their position in verses. For example, a tail rhyme denotes a rhyme located in the final syllables of each verse and is the most common type of position rhyme.


As you now know, there are many different types of rhymes. So, when you read a poem or some other rhyming text or listen to a song, how can you distinguish the type of rhyme used by the author? The answer is to use a rhyming scheme.


This site has a ton of advanced options for searching for finding new rhymes and helping you come up with fresh ideas. You can search for songs by rhyme type (i.e. end rhymes, perfect rhymes, etc), find the definition of the word, see variations of how the word can be used in context, or just look up a list of words by categories.


Here is another easy, go-to resource for findings rhymes. Rhymer allows you to quickly find rhymes and be able to search by 5 different rhyme types. On top of that, they provide great tips on the different rhyme types and how you can use them.


They also have a paid feature to gain access to a complete, extensive list of rhymes sets for each word. Expect this site to continue to grow and have more resources as people continue to contribute to it.


This songwriting resource is different from the others in that it is a paid app you can use for either your iPhone or Mac. Rhyme Genie is well known among pro songwriters and musicians. With an extensive list of rhymes, over 30 rhyme types, American sayings, cliches, idioms. This is one of the best rhyming dictionaries you will find.


From writing poems to writing birthday cards, and from the garrett to the classroom, the New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary has what every writer (or budding writer) needs. It contains rhymes for over 45,000 words, including proper names, place names, and foreign terms used in English. The fascinating introduction by Professor John Lennard offers a brief outline of rhyming in its literary and historical contexts, and gives further advice on creative writing. This new edition includes over 200 words added to the Oxford Dictionary of English since the publication of the last edition, including iPod, Americano, and vuvuzela. The New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary is a must-have tool for poets, lyricists, and writers of all kinds, as well as a delight for everyone who likes to play with words.


Really good rappers and poets only break out the rhyme-dictionary sometimes. In most cases your better off generating your own list of rhyming words and phrases for what you're trying to rhyme with. Tips on rhyming and writng rhymes can be found in The Rapper's Handbook.


Let's take a line from Slick Rick for example. This is from "The Auditorium" with Mos Def. His line is: Sit, come and relax, riddle off the mac, It's the patch, I'm a soldier in the middle of Iraq,Slick Rick never could have written that line with a rhyming dictionary. He rhymes "relax" with "mac" with "patch" with "Iraq." Off all of those, only "Iraq" and "mac" show up in a rhyming dictionary. So you're better off working off your own mind, using slant rhyme, and picking up The Rapper's Handbook.


There are many words that have no rhyme in the English language. "Orange" is only the most famous. Other words that have no rhyme include:silver, purple, month, ninth, pint, wolf,opus, dangerous, marathon and discombobulate.


But just because these words have no perfect rhyme doesn't mean we can't rhyme with them. Using slant rhyme, we can rhyme with these words anyway. To add anything to the list, email escher(at)flocabulary.com


Bronze, plus some silver and gold, Won't be of help if you shiver when cold.Other readers have insisted that the word "sporange" rhymes with "orange," but "sporange" appears in very few dictionaries. Apparently it's a botanical term for a sac that contains spores. Likewise the useful word "porange," which describes hair that grows where hair typically doesn't grow, is not in any dictionaries that we've found. Other readers have noted that a mountain overlooking the town of Abergavenny in Wales is named Blorenge. Some have insisted that a famous horse is buried there. In any event, the rhyme has been of use to a local bard with an extravagant name (Daffydd Traswfynnydd ap Llewellyn-Jones), who writes:


But are we really counting proper nouns? If that were the case, I just might name my daughter "Laurenge," just so she can grow up saying, "I rhyme with a rhymeless word." Still others have noted that "curple" rhymes with "purple." True. But the word - which means "hind-quarters or rump of a horse" - is no longer in much use. I guess it's up to us to bring it back. Others say we should include "nurple" - as in "purple nurple," a slang term for a very painful prank. But that slang term hasn't made its way into Webster's yet, even if "bootylicious" has.


No other dictionary matches M-W's accuracy and scholarship in defining word meanings. Our pronunciation help, synonyms, usage and grammar tips set the standard. Go beyond dictionary lookups with Word of the Day, facts and observations on language, lookup trends, and wordplay from the editors at Merriam-Webster Dictionary.


"agreement in terminal sounds of words or metrical lines," a 16c. attempt to restore a classical spelling to Middle English ryme, rime (c. 1200) "measure, meter, rhythm," later "rhymed verse" (mid-13c.), from Old French rime (fem.), which is related to Old Provençal rim (masc.), earlier *ritme, from Latin rithmus, from Greek rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry; arrangement, order; form, shape, wise, manner; soul, disposition," related to rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow").


In Medieval Latin, rithmus was used for accentual, as opposed to quantitative, verse, and accentual verse usually was rhymed, hence the sense shift. In prosody, specifically the quality of agreement in end-sounds such that the last stressed vowel, and any sounds after it, are the same, and preceding sounds differ.


The sense of "a piece of poetry in which consonance of end-sounds is observed" is from 1610s. From 1650s as "word that rhymes with another." The phrase rhyme or reason "good sense" (chiefly used in the negative) is from late 15c. (see reason (n.)). Rhyme scheme "ordered pattern of end-rhymes in metrical composition" is attested from 1931. Rhyme royal (1841) is a stanza of seven 10-syllable lines rhymed a-b-a-b-b-c-c.


a modern spelling variant or replacement of Middle English rime, rimen, from Old French rimer, from rime "verse" (see rhyme (n.)). The Middle English word is attested from late 12c. as "poetic measure, meter," from c. 1300 as "agreement in terminal sounds of words or metrical lines; a rhyming song or ballad."


The spelling shifted from mid-17c. by influence of rhythm and Latin rhythmus, from the same Greek source, and the intermediate form rhime is frequent for a while (Dryden and Steele have rhime; Pope and Scott rhyme). Related: Rhymed; rhyming; rhymer (Middle English rimer, early 15c., from rime, also from Anglo-French rimour, Old French rimeur).


The poetaster's rhyming dictionary is attested from 1775 (in John Walker's introduction to his "Dictionary of the English Language, Answering at once the Purposes of Rhyming, Spelling, and Pronouncing. On a Plan Not Hitherto Attempted"). The phrase rhyming slang for the Cockney disguised speech in which a word is replaced by a phrase which rhymes with it is attested from 1859 (the thing itself described by 1851). Especially if the rhyming word is then omitted, which seals the reference from the uninitiated: Richard, in rhyming slang "a girl" (a couple of likely Richards), short for Richard the Third, chosen to rhyme with bird "girl."


16c. spelling variant or attempted classical correction of Middle English rime "measure, meter, rhythm," also "agreement in end-sounds of words or metrical lines, rhyme; a rhyming poem" (12c.), from Old French rime "verse," from Latin rhythmus "movement in time," from Greek rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry; arrangement, order; form, shape, wise, manner; soul, disposition," related to rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Compare rhyme.


Rhymewave is a great rhyming app for songwriters, poets, and rappers. Simply type in a word and the website will give you hundreds of word suggestions in four columns.If you choose to use one of the suggested rhyming words, you can click the word, and get more ideas and suggestions to help keep the rhyme going.


From writing poems to writing birthday cards, and from the garrett to the classroom, the New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary has what every writer (or budding writer) needs. It contains rhymes for over 45,000 words, including proper names, place names, and foreign terms used in English. The organization and layout are remarkably clear, making it easy to find the rhymes you're looking for. Words are grouped clearly by sound and there is also a complete A-Z index to help you quickly navigate to the relevant section. In-text notes offer tips on using rhymes effectively, make suggestions for expanding the rhyming lists included in the book, and give examples of how poets past and present have used rhyme. The fascinating introduction by Professor John Lennard offers a brief outline of rhyming in its literary and historical contexts, and gives further advice on creative writing. This new edition includes over 200 words added to the Oxford Dictionary of English since the publication of the last edition, including iPod, Americano, and vuvuzela. The New Oxford Rhyming Dictionary is a must-have tool for poets, lyricists, and writers of all kinds, as well as a delight for everyone who likes to play with words. 041b061a72